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Financial Exploitation: 8 Warning Signs

The National Center on Elder Abuse estimates that 1 in 10 Americans aged 60 and older has experienced some form of abuse in the past year. Financial abuse and exploitation is a growing, painful, and costly form of this abuse. The annual financial loss by victims of elder financial exploitation was estimated to be $2.9 billion in 2009, a 12% increase from 2008. Also, survivors of elder mistreatment suffer significantly higher levels of psychological distress than non victims. Seabury wants to provide you with tips and resources to help you spot and report abuse. Financial abuse may sometimes start with family caregivers who borrow a little money from Dad’s bank account. The caregivers mean t

What Happens to Your Digital Footprint After You Die? An End-of-Life Planning Check-List

From advanced directives to last will and testaments, end-of-life planning often focuses on medical and financial decisions. But what happens to our digital footprint after we die? And how can we plan ahead to protect our online accounts and information? A deceased person’s (and family’s) financial information can be left vulnerable in inactive online social media and email accounts. Likewise, surviving family members may not be able to gain access to a relative’s account without prior planning, risking the loss of family photos, videos, documents, and other mementos. As with all end-of-life planning, you have options. Here’s an end-of-life digital planning check-list to aid your planning: –

Spiritual Resources for Retirement: What Congregations Can Do

What’s next? For the middle-aged among us, retirement looms, but often in a hazy distance. Given increasing lifespans and identities tied to work, when and whether to retire can be complicated, personal questions. Only the financial how of retirement is relatively straightforward and the subject of routine analysis. Almost entirely absent from discussion is the what of retirement. It is understood that the longtime worker is retiring from something. But what are they retiring to? And what if churches recognized this question mark as an opportunity to create or revitalize ministries with older adults? What if congregations intentionally drew upon retiree expertise to extend ministries and com

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Seabury Resources for Aging​

6031 Kansas Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20011

202-289-5690

info@seaburyresources.org

Seabury Resources for Aging is a private nonprofit 501(c) 3 organization. Seabury’s Identification Number (EIN) is 53-0204693.

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